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21 Days of Fantastic: Day 19, Know

Life can feel incredibly confusing at times, with choices abounding–these days possibly more than ever before in history.  Did you know that frequency of decision-making is associated with willpower fatigue?  That blew my mind.  No wonder by the end of the day we indulge–skip a workout, have a drink, grab some junk food.

I really enjoy a spontaneous schedule, but it is only enjoyable if we are going with the flow.  Peace comes from within!

It is one of the reasons to prioritize–it is like putting choices through a filter.

It also is one of the reasons to develop your intuition–decision-making becomes a snap.

But then you still are left to trust.

Friends have long wondered how I could make decisions so confidently–I figured it was because after I analyzed the choices, I made the best decision I could.  But one too many disappointments, one too many traumatic experiences finally left me in a state of fear.  I was questioned every decision and felt like I was constantly going in circles.  I was a mess!  It wasn’t just a spiral, it was a downward spiral!

So how did I climb my way out of that?

I made an appointment with my homeopath first.  The remedy he recommended for me pulled me out of a state of crisis.

I reduced external inputs of stress and fear [e.g. news, entertainment].

Then I made an appointment with an energy therapist.

I also started working with angels.  A lot.

Then something miraculous happened:  I began to see signs.  Lots of signs!  Signs that I was on the right path.  Signs that the choices I had made were indeed successful, even if the outcomes were not the ones I’d hoped or expected.

I had prayed frequently and fervently for that sense of knowing that I was on the right path, but until I was in [enough of] a state of calm and peace inside, I couldn’t recognize any signs on the outside.

So if you feel drained at the end of the day from all of the decisions you need to make, reduce the ones that you can, work on clearing your obstacles of fear, and develop your inner sense of knowing.

DISCLAIMER:  THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY

  • The information on this site is posted for educational purposes only, and not intended to constitute medical advice. As with any important medical matter, you are advised to consult an experienced health care provider concerning your specific health concerns.
  • No doctor-patient relationship is intended, implied or created by the posting or viewing of information on this site; nor is a doctor-patient relationship created by the submission or exchange of questions or information via email or otherwise with Pamela Lialias.
  • Readers are responsible for their use of information provided on this blog or linked to from this site. Pamela Lialias assumes no liability for the same.
  • Pamela Lialias has made reasonable efforts to ensure the accuracy of information on this blog site, but absolute accuracy is not guaranteed.
  • Always check with your health care provider.
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21 Days of Fantastic: Day 16, Intuit

My life is so much easier because I can access my intuition for any number of choices.  I highly recommend it, even if only for selecting gifts, books, or wine!

Here’s the simplest, most replicable version of how I do it:

Protect and Ground.

Take a deep breath.

Keep your mind empty.

Present yourself a statement in the negative and the positive.  Start with a question to which you already know the answer: your name, your birthday.  Present yourself with a wrong answer.  Notice how you feel in response.  Present yourself with the correct answer.  Notice how you feel in response.

When you get that aaaah, just right feeling, it is the ideal.  So when you are using your intuition to select something, generally speaking, the closer you get to that feeling, the closer that choice is to ideal.

 

DISCLAIMER:  THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY

  • The information on this site is posted for educational purposes only, and not intended to constitute medical advice. As with any important medical matter, you are advised to consult an experienced health care provider concerning your specific health concerns.
  • No doctor-patient relationship is intended, implied or created by the posting or viewing of information on this site; nor is a doctor-patient relationship created by the submission or exchange of questions or information via email or otherwise with Pamela Lialias.
  • Readers are responsible for their use of information provided on this blog or linked to from this site. Pamela Lialias assumes no liability for the same.
  • Pamela Lialias has made reasonable efforts to ensure the accuracy of information on this blog site, but absolute accuracy is not guaranteed.
  • Always check with your health care provider.
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Knowing Me, Knowing You

I was born in a small mission hospital in a village in southern India, in the state of Tamil Nadu.  I wonder where my big sister was when I was born … maybe my grandparents had come over to India to take care of her while I was born.  And to meet me, hopefully [I can hear them say, “yes, absolutely”].  My dad worked a lot but played with us when he came home so I rarely truly felt his absence.  My mom was mostly a stay-at-home mom and a loving one, so that helped too!

I grew up in India at a time when all Western material goods were banned.  There was no television, no 7up, no bubble gum.  There were Tamil songs on the radio, Tamil movies in the theaters [though Jaws came–it was so terrifying I hid behind the back curtains for most of the movie], and there were Indian candies and sodas.

My older sister preferred to speak Tamil like her playmates.  So on the eve of my [non-Tamil-speaking] grandparents’ visit, my parents had resorted to speaking only English in the house.  As a result, I grew up knowing barely any Tamil.  I could count; say hello and goodbye; and I most definitely knew how to express, “enough” because at our favorite restaurant they heaped on the curry until we said, “poathum” and held our right hands over our plates [never the left hand–that’s used for unhygienic tasks].  Oh, and I could sing the Indian national anthem [but that is not in Tamil].  That kind of thing.

Eventually, we moved to what is now called Chennai and was then called Madras.  In Madras, the United States had a consulate, and every so often, the consulate would show American movies for ex-pats like us.  I spent many of those hovering in my dad’s lap, too.  Movies were frequently scary or upsetting for me.  Frankly, they still are.  So is the news.

Being sensitive means that I can hear Spirit, I can feel Spirit or other people’s feelings.  It means that I am sensitive to energy and can pick-up on signals that other people might not.  But it also means that I can pick-up on signals that other people might not.  See what I mean?

I spent much of my life being told that I was over-reacting.  It was only in my adulthood, as I began uncovering my gift, that I realized that yes, I was much more sensitive than most people.  As with most traits, that comes with challenges and advantages.  The main advantage is that I can tune-in to energies that others cannot.  The main disadvantage is that I frequently am overwhelmed, disturbed, upset by stories or events or statements that do not affect others this way.  That means I have to be careful about watching the news and movies or wondering what happened in an apparent tragedy [because I might start channeling the spirits involved in the tragedy, and I try not to do that unless i can actively help someone with the information I receive].

Luckily, I also grew up in what PBS once called the Empire of the Spirit. When Oprah visited recently, she also was impressed with how deeply infused the people and culture are with spirituality.  As a spiritual person, a curious person, that was great for me.  As a person who was sensitive to other people’s feelings, there were parts of it that were hard.  The way animals were treated, the way outcastes were treated.  We often had people waiting outside our house to talk to our parents to request financial assistance for food, medical care, education.

When we returned to that village years later, once again there were people lining-up on the porch before dawn, waiting to see my parents.  This time, they had traveled, sometimes days, and brought gifts like towels or flowers from their meager bits of spending money to thank my parents.  Gosh, can you believe that gratitude?!  They never forget a kindness, and they rarely take generosity for granted.  Mostly, my parents had supported their educations, thereby giving them a chance at better jobs and lives for their families.   They developed a sort of policy:  Give them just enough to help them help themselves.  A leg-up.  Gosh, that does a person’s soul some good.  It’s good to do it yourself, and it is good to see your parents do it.

When I graduated from Duke Law, I received my class’ award for pro bono service [I had been the student leader of the Duke Law Innocence Project, which works to free the wrongfully convicted from prison].  The other awards were for academic achievements and seemed more prestigious to me at the time.  As much as my parents emphasized education–having been educational missionaries and obtaining advanced degrees–my father said he was most proud to see me receiving an award for having been of service.

I can’t take credit for what I haven’t done or who I haven’t been.  I can try hard to be who God created me to be, to live my life to its best and fullest.  I don’t know who you are or who you are meant to be, but I do know God created you to be a spectacular you, and we can all be glad for that too.

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Exercise it carefully! A lesson in free will

I had a quick lesson in free will this morning that so concisely represents the human spiritual experience.

As I backed into the driveway from my garage en route to school on this rainy day, my daughter noticed that one of the cats had run out–he must’ve been in the garage and run out when he was frightened by the door and car.  With a lot of coyotes around here, we try to keep him indoors when we’re not around to let him in quickly.

So, I parked the car and prepared to get the cat back inside.  I immediately felt I should take my keys with me.  I decided against it and continued my efforts to get out of the car [seatbelt, jacket, etc.].  Again I felt I should take my keys with me.  It probably happened 3 times.  So I took some time to figure out why I would need my keys — pro’s and con’s.  All very reasonable and logical and sound.  I decided against the keys, of course.  Otherwise I wouldn’t be writing this post!

Spoiler alert:  That was my free will, deciding to leave the keys on account of reasoning.  Listening to my intuition [or Spirit, more specifically] would’ve been following that unreasonable but persistent sense that I should take the keys.

I left the car running, got out and pursued the cat.  Kissy sounds, sweet kitty calls, and all of it.  He just kept walking further down our walk.  Well, wouldn’t you know, he walked right up to the front door and waited for me.  But could I let him in the front door?  No I could not.  And why not?  Because I had left my keys in the car!

So I picked him up, and he was okay … until he heard the sound of the car, which of course, I had left running with the keys in it.  He started freaking out, scratching me, scratching my coat [I was sure it would rip!].  It was quite the tussle from there to get him in the house.

I had been forewarned and I overrode it with free will.

This is a tiny, tightly packaged lesson in free will.  Every single time that we exercise free will to turn away from a higher choice, it is because of fear.*  Today, I chose to leave the keys because I was worried my youngest would freak out about the DVD player if I turned off the car.  Yes, you read that correctly.  It might seem ridiculously understandable, ridiculously ridiculous, or just plain funny, but so it is.  That is what I did.  And in so doing, I exercised free will to choose against Spirit’s guidance, and look where it got me!

We do this every day in big and small ways–exercise our free will to override the advice of Spirit.  Spirit is always trying to help us lead our best lives.  If only we would listen every time.

*I want to add a post-script about fear, because I do believe in the Gift of Fear.  This is a good chance to parse all of that out:  What is intuition / the voice of Spirit, what is fear / the voice of Spirit, and what is fear / blocking intuition?  I am not an expert, but this is what I understand and is consistent with my experiences:

Both fear and intuition that are representative of the voice of Spirit tend to be inexplicable.  You cannot reason your way into it, it just is.  You just have a feeling, a thought that pops into your head, etc.  You could read more on it in Gavin DeBecker’s The Gift of Fear, and I’ve heard Michael Neill talk about it on Hay House Radio.  Cynthia Slon also has explained to me that all worry essentially comes from assumptions we make about the future.